American Diabetes Association gives $9.75 million for Pathway to Stop Diabetes Research Grants

SHARE

The American Diabetes Association (Association) announced $9.75 million to six recipients of the 2017 Pathway to Stop Diabetes (Pathway) research grants, providing $1.625 million to each scientist over a five- to seven-year grant term to spur breakthroughs in clinical science, technology, diabetes care and potential cures.

Pathway grants are awarded in three categories: 1)  Pathway Initiator, for postdoctoral fellows who are transitioning from training to research; 2)  Pathway Accelerator, for diabetes researchers early in their independent careers; and 3)  Pathway Visionary, for scientists established in another field who are interested in applying their expertise to diabetes research for the first time.

“Pathway to Stop Diabetes is a unique program in the fight against diabetes. The Pathway program provides exceptional researchers with multiyear grants that allow them to follow the science where it leads them,” said C. Ronald Kahn, MD, chair of the Association’s Mentor Advisory Group, which advises the Association on Pathway, senior investigator and past president of the Joslin Diabetes Center, and the Mary K. Iacocca Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. Now in its fourth year, the program is supporting six new grant recipients starting their projects in 2017:

Now in its fourth year, the program is supporting six new grant recipients starting their projects in 2017:

  • Jonathan N. Flak, PhD, University of Michigan, in Ann Arbor, received a Pathway Initiator Award for his basic research project titled, “Targeting the VMN to Understand Hypoglycemia Pathogenesis.”
  • Aleksandar David Kostic, PhD, Joslin Diabetes Center, in Boston, received a Pathway Initiator Award for his basic research project titled, “Generation of an in vivo System for Dissection of the Human Type 1 Diabetes-associated Microbiome.”
  • Paul Cohen, MD, PhD, The Rockefeller University, in New York, received a Pathway Accelerator Award for his basic research project titled, “Dissecting the Role of Beige Fat in Metabolic Homeostasis.”
  • Sarah A. Stanley, MD, PhD, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, in New York, received a Pathway Accelerator Award for her basic research project titled, “Central Nervous System Regulation of Glucose Metabolism.”
  • Sumita Pennathur, PhD, University of California, Santa Barbara, received a Pathway Visionary Award for her basic research project titled, “Untethering Diabetes through Innovative Engineering.”
  • David A. Spiegel, MD, PhD, Yale University School of Medicine, in New Haven, Conn. received a Pathway Visionary Award for his translational research project titled, “Targeting Glucosepane Crosslinks in Diabetes.”

Since launching in 2013 and including the six 2017 awardees, Pathway has awarded more than $36 million to 23 leading scientists. Each awardee is selected from a highly competitive application pool of only one nominee per institution; approximately 100 applications are received each year. Their list of accomplishments to-date is notable:

  • Five Pathway Initiator awardees secured their first independent faculty positions;
  • Three patents have been filed by Pathway scientists to protect the intellectual property they have uncovered; and
  • Nearly 40 manuscripts published in peer-reviewed journals by Pathway awardees.

The scientific contributions include notable advances in developing a “smart insulin” patch; identifying a molecular trigger for the autoimmune attack that causes type 1 diabetes; linking genetic and environmental factors to the development of type 2 diabetes; and uncovering how diabetes causes blindness, among other complications.

The Pathway program is supported by more than $40 million in contributions from corporate sponsors Sanofi, Novo Nordisk, the Eli Lilly and Company Foundation, Merck, and AstraZeneca, along with generous philanthropic support from individuals and foundations. The funds allow the Pathway grant program to extend support to individuals who are just starting their independent research careers, as well as to exceptional scientists already established in other fields of research who want to apply their expertise to diabetes.

 

Comments

comments