A Little Chocolate Everyday Could Lower Diabetes Risk, Heart Disease

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Chocolate and Diabetes - Everyday Diabetes

Anew study says that a small amount of dark chocolate every day may lower the chance of heart disease and diabetes.

This according to researchers at the Luxembourg Institute of Health, the University of Warwick Medical School, the University of Maine, and the University of Australia.

THE RESEARCHERS SAID THE STUDY NEEDS FURTHER RESEARCH AND OBSERVATIONAL STUDIES TO BETTER UNDERSTAND THE ROLE OF CHOCOLATES IN CARDIOMETABOLIC DISEASES AND INSULIN RESISTANCE.

By analyzing data from the study made by the Observation of Cardiovascular Risk in Luxembourg that tracked 1,153 individuals aged 18 to 69 the research focused on lifestyle as well as dietary routine, including consumption of coffee and tea.

It was found that those who ate 100g of chocolate a day – equivalent to a bar – had reduced insulin resistance and improved liver enzymes.

The connection between chocolate with tea and coffee is they can be high in polyphenol, the substance which may provide chocolate with its beneficial cardiometabolic effects.

The initial thinking was that eating chocolates had beneficial effects on liver enzymes and insulin sensitivity. From there they crossed checked a nationally conducted food frequency questionnaire.

80 percent of the participants said they ate an average of 24.8 grams (0.05 pound) of chocolate every day.

Not so fast

However, the study did note that those who consumed the chocolates were younger and more physically active and have better education –contributing to a healthier lifestyle overall.

“Given the growing body of evidence, including our own study, cocoa-based products may represent an additional dietary recommendation to improve cardio-metabolic health; however, observational results need to be supported by robust trial evidence,” said Saverio Stranges, of the University of Warwick Medical School in Coventry, England.

Stranges also warned that people must be sure to differentiate between natural cocoa-based products from processed ones. He also added that a person’s lifestyle, including physical activity and diet, must be given to consideration on how to balance the detrimental effects of chocolate on weight.

The researchers said the study needs further research and observational studies to better understand the role of chocolates in cardiometabolic diseases and insulin resistance.


As always consult your healthcare provider before altering your diet plan.

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