Type 2 Diabetes Reversed in Mice in New San Diego Study

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According to a study led by San Diego scientist, type 2 diabetes has been reversed in mice with a new orally available drug. The study results suggest a path for developing human therapies based on the drug in the future.

The drug protected mice from high-fat induced diabetes without affecting body weight, according to the study. It also reversed signs of the disease in mice who already had it.

If this new drug works as described, it could be used to reverse insulin resistance, but we need to know first if it does that safely in people.

Stephanie Stanford of the University of California, San Diego, and her team have found that giving mice with diabetes a drug daily that affects insulin signaling restores their lost ability to control their blood sugar levels.

The drug did not seem to have any side effects in the mice. The animals had developed the condition after a high-fat diet had made them obese.

“This could lead to a new therapeutic strategy for treating type 2 diabetes,” said Stanford, whose team believes that the drug could lead to fewer people with adult-onset diabetes becoming dependent on insulin injections. “If this new drug works as described, it could be used to reverse insulin resistance, but we need to know first if it does that safely in people,” says Burns.

The drug works by inhibiting an enzyme called low molecular weight protein tyrosine phosphatase (LMPTP), it’s one of the human body enzymes that deactivates the insulin receptor.

“Our findings suggest that LMPTP activity plays a key role in the development of insulin resistance and that LMPTP inhibitors would be beneficial for treating type 2 diabetes,” the study stated.

Read more at The New Scientist.

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